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Velvet Buzzsaw Review

By Martha Sigargök-Martin | Films

Feb 26
marthasfilmcorner.com

Genre: Horror, Fantastic, Thriller | Country: USA | 2019

Directed and written by Dan Gilroy

Starring: Jack Gyllenhaal, Rene Russo, Zawe Ashton, Toni Colette, Natalia Dyer, John Malkovich

A Strange Atmosphere

Film director Dan Gilroy has a long experience as a screenwriter, but Velvet Buzzsaw is "only" his third film as a director.

If your bell is ringing when you hear his name, it's maybe because you've watched the very strange and fascinating Nitghtcrawler (2014) about an aspiring paparazzi (excellent Jack Gyllenhaal), who's ready to pursue any avenue to get the most shocking scoops.

Velvet Buzzsaw is set in Miami, among professionals living from the art. Competition, mockery, and hypocrisy is daily business, and as Josephina (Zawe Ashton), discovers the paintings of her dead neighbor, she seizes the opportunity to make herself a name in the world of the art business.

As expected, it's not going to be that easy, and a strange and a little kitsch story about haunted paintings takes its course.

An Impressive Cast And Funny Dialogues

Dan Gilroy has a world-class cast for his third movie.

Except for the brilliant Jack Gyllenhaal, the enigmatic Zawe Ashton, and the charismatic Rene Russo, household names like John Malkovich or Toni Colette are performing in a supporting role.

Every character in this film is exactly as a stranger to the world of art would imagine them: ruthless, pretentious and self-absorbed.

Despite the fact that's over the top, Dan Gilroy managed to make a quite funny and amusing portrait of his protagonists.

Amusing dialogues and acerbic comments strike the right note and make the audience laugh here and there, but just because it's suiting this superficial and greedy world the director ​depicts.

And that's a little the problem here...

A Cliché of The World of Curators, Artists, And Critics

It comes across as a persiflage, instead as of something scary.

Logline and spoiler: Cruel and greedy people got what they deserved.

Ok, it's horror, so it has to be kind of apocalyptical and moralistic, but at some points, it's just too much.

Even if it's inherent to the genre, It becomes especially implausible towards the end.

Especially the last scene, which inspired the film title, is outrageously ridiculous.

Should You Watch It?

it depends on how what you're expecting.

For the caustic dialogues, the - sorry, but kind of funny - clichés of curators, critics, and artists, and the performances, definitely!

If you're expecting something profound, I would advice against it.

But, honestly, this is horror. So it doesn't have to be deep and philosophical (of course it can be).

Being entertaining is enough.

Please, share your opinion on this below, I'd like to hear it 🙂

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About the Author

Hello there, I'm Martha, a tenacious optimist, multi passionated human being obsessed with improvement and breakthroughs. I'm a pain in the ass when it comes to accepting status quo and I love inspiring films and books because they go to the depth of our feelings, have the power to change perspective and sometimes to heal.

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